21st August 2014

Photo reblogged from Pemberley Digital with 167 notes

fitzsimmonsing:

Have I told you guys about my lock screen yet?

fitzsimmonsing:

Have I told you guys about my lock screen yet?

Source: fitzsimmonsing

21st August 2014

Post reblogged from the little things with 717,495 notes

miss-mixi:

If you played with Barbies,

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Polly Pockets,

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Beanie Babies,

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Tamagotchi,

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Slip N’ Slide,

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And Furbies,

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Listened to the Backstreet Boys, Britney Spears, NSync and the Spice Girls

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On Hit Clips, a Boom Box, or a Walkman,

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Collected and traded Pokemon cards,

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Wrote with Gel Pens,

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Wore butterfly clips,

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And Snap Bracelets,

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And remember watching these guys:

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reblog

Source: dappledthings21

20th August 2014

Photo reblogged from bold as love with 460,874 notes

secretcallgirl:

#the motto

secretcallgirl:

#the motto

Source: poisonouschicken

20th August 2014

Photo reblogged from chronicles of a conundrum with 116 notes

Source: weareacre

20th August 2014

Photo reblogged from bold as love with 235,809 notes

Source: mrcheyl

20th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from HARTO with 154,819 notes

merryweatherblue:

I took my little brother (who falls on the autism spectrum) to see Guardians of the Galaxy and after this scene he lit up like a Christmas tree and screamed “He’s like me! He can’t do metaphors!” And for the rest of the film my brother stared at Drax in a state of rapture. 

So for the last 6 days I have heard my brother repeatedly quote all of the Drax lines from the movie verbatim (one of his talents), begin studying vocabulary test words, and tell everyone he knows that people with autism can also be superheroes.

Now I am not saying that Drax the Destroyer is, or was ever, intended to be autistic. All I am saying is that it warmed my heart to see my brother have an opportunity to identify himself with a character known for his strength, badassness, and honor. And that is pretty damn awesome. 

So while I adored Guardians of the Galaxy as a great fun loving film with cool characters I can do nothing but thank Marvel Studios and Dave Bautista for finally bringing a superhero to the screen that my little brother can relate to.

Source: merryweatherblue

20th August 2014

Quote reblogged from chronicles of a conundrum with 5,494 notes

Being brave doesn’t mean you aren’t scared. Being brave means you are scared, really scared, badly scared, and you do the right thing anyway.
— Neil Gaiman (via onlinecounsellingcollege)

Source: onlinecounsellingcollege

19th August 2014

Post reblogged from Sprinkle of Glitter with 104,874 notes

bemusedlybespectacled:

do you ever think about the judges for the triwizard tournament trying to figure out who to kidnap for the second task

like they’re all just sitting in dumbledore’s office and karkaroff goes “well word on the street says that krum has a crush on that granger girl”

"damn," says dumbledore, "I wanted harry to rescue her. well, what about the delightful miss chang?"

"no," says bagman, "we’ve got her down for diggory"

"stop sinking my ships," says dumbledore

Source: bemusedlybespectacled

19th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Humans of New York with 11,348 notes

humansofnewyork:

"My brother went to college in America, and it was very hard for my parents to send him there. My father worked two jobs. I’d always hear him talking to my mother about money troubles. So when I graduated from high school, I went straight to work, to help pay for my brother’s school. I never resented it, because I knew he was more intelligent than me, and he deserved it. But now he has a great job in Australia, and I wish that I’d gone to college. But you know what? That same brother married into a family with two sisters. He married the older sister. And at the wedding, I met the younger sister, we danced, and now we are married. Her name means ‘angel,’ and she is my angel. And I tell her every day that she’s better than being a millionaire. So my brother got his job. And I got my wife." (Dhana, Jordan)

humansofnewyork:

"My brother went to college in America, and it was very hard for my parents to send him there. My father worked two jobs. I’d always hear him talking to my mother about money troubles. So when I graduated from high school, I went straight to work, to help pay for my brother’s school. I never resented it, because I knew he was more intelligent than me, and he deserved it. But now he has a great job in Australia, and I wish that I’d gone to college. But you know what? That same brother married into a family with two sisters. He married the older sister. And at the wedding, I met the younger sister, we danced, and now we are married. Her name means ‘angel,’ and she is my angel. And I tell her every day that she’s better than being a millionaire. So my brother got his job. And I got my wife." (Dhana, Jordan)

19th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from the little things with 179,861 notes

sp0iledbabe:

blowmarisol:

highfromsanfrancisco:

Always reblog

10/10 THIS

I actually adore her because I’ve NEVER seen a black person get to be so fucking frank and honest about racial injustice on tv.

She’s real, she’s smart, she’s witty, she’s informed and she’s fucking unapologetic. I’m obsessed.

Source: vangoghmygod

19th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from chronicles of a conundrum with 509,820 notes

hello-imaliveandwandwell:

hiroshimalated:

Please keep this circulating. Cops are getting more and more brazen, know your rights!

good to know

19th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Humans of New York with 2,766 notes

humansofnewyork:

"The Zaatari Refugee Camp is twelve kilometers from the Syrian border, and has become the fourth largest city in Jordan. At its peak last year, over 3,000 Syrians refugees were entering the camp every day. This was a biblical level of population movement. Over 400,000 people have lived in the camp at some point in the last two years. UNHCR has responded to their basic needs: sanitation, food, healthcare. But there’s a large gap between survival and livelihood. For lack of a better word, boredom has become a big problem. It’s too dangerous to return to Syria, and there are very limited ways to be productive inside the camp. But the adaptations have been amazing. This is unlike any other refugee camp in the world. The Syrians are coming from a middle class economy, so they are a very skilled population— they aren’t subsistence farmers. They’ve managed to build an economy inside the camp. Most of the tents have been upgraded to houses. The refugees trade with the Jordanians, and bring in supplies from the outside to start their own shops. One man even started a supermarket. It’s still a tough situation. But arriving with nothing, the Syrian refugees have managed to carve out their own dignity inside the camp. They aren’t just taking what is given to them. They’ve created choices for themselves.” 
-Gavin White, UNHCR Jordan External Relations Officer

humansofnewyork:

"The Zaatari Refugee Camp is twelve kilometers from the Syrian border, and has become the fourth largest city in Jordan. At its peak last year, over 3,000 Syrians refugees were entering the camp every day. This was a biblical level of population movement. Over 400,000 people have lived in the camp at some point in the last two years. UNHCR has responded to their basic needs: sanitation, food, healthcare. But there’s a large gap between survival and livelihood. For lack of a better word, boredom has become a big problem. It’s too dangerous to return to Syria, and there are very limited ways to be productive inside the camp. But the adaptations have been amazing. This is unlike any other refugee camp in the world. The Syrians are coming from a middle class economy, so they are a very skilled population— they aren’t subsistence farmers. They’ve managed to build an economy inside the camp. Most of the tents have been upgraded to houses. The refugees trade with the Jordanians, and bring in supplies from the outside to start their own shops. One man even started a supermarket. It’s still a tough situation. But arriving with nothing, the Syrian refugees have managed to carve out their own dignity inside the camp. They aren’t just taking what is given to them. They’ve created choices for themselves.” 

-Gavin White, UNHCR Jordan External Relations Officer

18th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Hank's Tumblr with 67,765 notes

edwardspoonhands:

christel-thoughts:

pattilahell:

issarae:

Necessary.

I signed a change.org petition asking that this, among other necessary policies be made mandatory by federal law. FUCKING SIGN IT.

well would you look at that…

I think this will happen…many police unions do not want it to happen, but I think it will happen. It will take a lot of time and a lot of fighting, but every moment of that fight is going to be worth it. 
Police unions will want more research, I think that’s important, and that research is being done now. While use of force and number of complaints are important statistics, so is overall crime rate (which unions will argue is adversely affected (because officers are thinking about how they’ll look on camera, not how to do their jobs) unless there are overwhelming data to counter that claim).
Also vitally important will be whether these save police departments money (which they probably will, in reduced complaints and simpler court cases.) 
And let’s not forget about privacy…if these videos are being uploaded to cloud-based evidence systems (which they probably will be) who is going to have access to them? What do you do with videos that have nothing to do with active cases? How long are videos stored for? How do you protect that data? Who decides when the cameras are on or off (civil rights orgs (and I) will argue that they must be always-on, police officers will say “what about when I’m peeing.”) And, if there’s an off switch, we can assume the off switch will get used at the exact time when we will have wanted it to be on.
As I say, this is coming, and it’s important, and it will be a force that runs counter to a lot of the bullshit police work that’s being done in some places in America…but the areas where it’s most vital will be the ones where it arrives last.
And, unfortunately, the federal government will never be able to make a blanket law because congress can’t even agree if flowers are pretty.
This is going to have to be a battle fought in every city in America individually, don’t let that drain your will. Yes, it would be better if it just happened tomorrow, but it will be worse if we all get lazy and say “it’s not happening the way I want so I don’t care if it happens at all.” 
Fuck that…we need do make it happen whatever way we can, even if it takes a long-ass time. 
Sincerely,An Old Guy

edwardspoonhands:

christel-thoughts:

pattilahell:

issarae:

Necessary.

I signed a change.org petition asking that this, among other necessary policies be made mandatory by federal law. FUCKING SIGN IT.

well would you look at that…

I think this will happen…many police unions do not want it to happen, but I think it will happen. It will take a lot of time and a lot of fighting, but every moment of that fight is going to be worth it. 

Police unions will want more research, I think that’s important, and that research is being done now. While use of force and number of complaints are important statistics, so is overall crime rate (which unions will argue is adversely affected (because officers are thinking about how they’ll look on camera, not how to do their jobs) unless there are overwhelming data to counter that claim).

Also vitally important will be whether these save police departments money (which they probably will, in reduced complaints and simpler court cases.) 

And let’s not forget about privacy…if these videos are being uploaded to cloud-based evidence systems (which they probably will be) who is going to have access to them? What do you do with videos that have nothing to do with active cases? How long are videos stored for? How do you protect that data? Who decides when the cameras are on or off (civil rights orgs (and I) will argue that they must be always-on, police officers will say “what about when I’m peeing.”) And, if there’s an off switch, we can assume the off switch will get used at the exact time when we will have wanted it to be on.

As I say, this is coming, and it’s important, and it will be a force that runs counter to a lot of the bullshit police work that’s being done in some places in America…but the areas where it’s most vital will be the ones where it arrives last.

And, unfortunately, the federal government will never be able to make a blanket law because congress can’t even agree if flowers are pretty.

This is going to have to be a battle fought in every city in America individually, don’t let that drain your will. Yes, it would be better if it just happened tomorrow, but it will be worse if we all get lazy and say “it’s not happening the way I want so I don’t care if it happens at all.” 

Fuck that…we need do make it happen whatever way we can, even if it takes a long-ass time. 

Sincerely,
An Old Guy

Source: issarae

18th August 2014

Photo reblogged from Sprinkle of Glitter with 13,237 notes

Source: R2--D2

18th August 2014

Photoset reblogged from the little things with 140,529 notes

derselala:

facts-i-just-made-up:

Master Post of the best of the great “Show us your dick”-a-thon of 2014.

Here’s the previous one.

holy fucking shit

Source: facts-i-just-made-up